TEFAF New York 2024: 20 Editor-Approved Picks Not to Miss


Next weekend, culturalists will gather at the Park Avenue Armory for the 10th annual edition of TEFAF New York 2024, the American satellite of the Dutch fair out of Maastricht. Running May 10 to 14, with a VIP preview on May 9, TEFAF—or The European Fine Art Foundation—will feature modern and contemporary art, design, antiquities, and jewelry from 90 different exhibitors representing 15 countries.

“It’s always great to return to [the Park Avenue Armory] and continue TEFAF’s legacy within the city’s incredible art scene, bringing together captivating objects from top international dealers,” says Hidde van Seggelen, TEFAF executive committee president. “The interaction between the genres of modern and contemporary art, jewelry, antiquities and design draws collectors to TEFAF, which is why we are also thrilled to be showcasing a broad range of works in the historic period rooms at the Park Avenue Armory, incorporating the landmark’s own design elements into the mix.”

Highlights at this edition will include works by names known as well as more experimental up-and-comers. As usual, TEFAF New York 2024 will host gallery standouts: Friedman Benda (don’t miss its display of anthropomorphic lamps by Carmen D’Apollonio), Spruth Magers (a white marble bench by Jenny Holzer is a highlight), and Yves Macaux (with its 131 pieces of vintage Josef Hoffmann flatware) among them. At Richard Green, Henry Moore’s reclining figures will appeal to fans of midcentury abstraction. London’s ceramic sage Adrian Sassoon is back for another year, this time showing Kate Malone’s bubbling atomic collection. And there’s plenty more.

Continuing our tradition of AD Selects, our editors have perused this year’s TEFAF offerings and curated 20 objects, which will bear an identifying AD Selects placard. At the fair, keep your eyes peeled in order to scout our following favorites.

Adrian Sasson

Kate Malone, Tall Atomic, 2024

Courtesy of Adrian Sasson Gallery

Axel Vervoordt

César, Compression, 1970

Courtesy of Axel Vervoordt

Beck & Eggeling

Aljoscha, Phylogenetic Utopias – Bioism Engineering of the Ethical Bliss

Courtesy of Beck & Eggeling

Edward Tyler Nahem Fine Art

Jadé Fadojutimi, Fleetingly Fresh, 2018

Courtesy of Edward Tyler Nahem Fine Art

Friedman Benda

Carmen D’Apollonio, I Only Speak French Today, 2023

Courtesy of Friedman Benda

Galerie Chastel-Maréchal

Line Vautrin, Mirror “Aux Alouettes,” 1955

Courtesy of Galerie Chastel-Maréchal

Galerie Kreo

Virgil Abloh, Tower Hills, 2021

Courtesy of Galerie Kreo

Galerie Maria Wettergren

Laura Bergsøe, coffee table, 2023

Courtesy of Galerie Maria Wettergren

Gana Art

Chiharu Shiota, State of Being (Book), 2023

Courtesy of Gana Art

Geoffrey Diner Gallery

Judie Kensley McKie, Panther Table, 1988

Courtesy of Geoffrey Diner Gallery

Hostler Burrows

Egevaerk Studio (Mette Bentzen & Lasse Kristensen), Glacier Shape #1, 2019–24

Courtesy of Hostler Burrows

Egevaerk Studio (Mette Bentzen & Lasse Kristensen), Glacier Shape #2, 2019–24

Courtesy of Hostler Burrows

Leon Trovar Gallery

Rufino Tamayo, Claustrofobia, 1954

Courtesy of Leon Trovar Gallery

Modernity Stockholm

Paavo Tynell, The Snowflake Chandelier, ca. 1954–56

Courtesy of Modernity Stockholm

R & Company

Lina Bo Bardi, Bardi’s Bowl, ca. 1953–70

Courtesy of R & Company

Richard Green

Henry Moore, Reclining Figure, 1945

Courtesy of Richard Green

Salon 94

Rebecca Salsbury James, Seashells on the Sands, 1935

Courtesy of Salon 94

Rebecca Salsbury James, Seashells on the Sands, 1935

Courtesy of Salon 94

Sean Kelly

Sam Moyer, Memory Line #3, 2023

Courtesy of Sean Kelly

Spruth Magers

Jenny Holzer, Truisms: Freedom Is a Luxury Not a Necessity, 2013–22

Courtesy of Spruth Magers

Tina Kim Gallery

Seo-Bo Park, Ecriture No. 080525, 2008

Courtesy of Tina Kim Gallery

Yves Macaux

Josef Hoffmann, 131-piece Flat Model cutlery set for 12 people, 1903–05

Courtesy of Yves Macaux



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